Interpreting the Prophets
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Interpreting the Prophets

Reading, Understanding and Preaching from the Worlds of the Prophets

Aaron Chalmers

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eBook - ePub

Interpreting the Prophets

Reading, Understanding and Preaching from the Worlds of the Prophets

Aaron Chalmers

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The prophetic books are some of the most captivating and fascinating texts of the Old Testament, but they are also some of the most misunderstood. Interpreting the Prophets equips the reader with the knowledge and skills they need to interpret the Prophets in a faithful and accurate fashion.Beginning with the nature of the prophetic role and prophetic books in Israel, Old Testament scholar Aaron Chalmers leads the reader through the various "worlds" of Israel's prophets—historical, social, theological and rhetorical— providing the basic contextual and background information needed both for sound and sensible exegesis, and for sensitive interpretation and application for today. He concludes with a helpful chapter giving guidelines for preaching from the Prophets—including advice on choosing the texts, making appropriate analogies, and the potential problems and common pitfalls to avoid.

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Jahr
2014
ISBN
9780830898411

1 What is a prophet and what is a prophetic book?

1.1 Introduction
Given that we are focusing on interpreting the prophetic literature in this book, it seems appropriate to begin our journey with a discussion of what an Israelite prophet actually was. This is not as straightforward as it may at first seem. Since ‘prophet’ is a label which we still employ today to refer to various individuals, it is all too easy for us to allow contemporary conceptions to colour our understanding of ancient usage. This is problematic on a number of levels, as I will explain below. Furthermore, our attempts to come up with a concise definition are complicated by the presence of significant variations within the phenomenon of prophecy itself in ancient Israel. This makes it difficult to come up with useful, unifying, overarching statements. As Goldingay has recognized:
Defining prophecy is a notoriously difficult matter. Any description of prophecy that has bite will turn out not to apply to every First Testament prophet, let alone to prophets in the New Testament. A definition that does apply to every prophet will turn out to be somewhat vacuous and/or apply to people other than prophets. (2011: 311)
In spite of the difficulty, however, I believe that such an attempt is worth the effort – developing an accurate picture of what a prophet was in ancient Israel provides a context for better understanding the writings with which they were associated.
In the second part of this chapter we will consider the journey from prophetic personage to prophetic book, a journey which may be longer and more complex than we assume. As exegetes of the biblical text, our primary focus is not the prophets per se but the books that bear their name. Therefore, it is worth considering the process by which the primarily spoken words of the prophets became the written words which we now have before us.
1.2 What is a prophet? Modern answers
The following three quotes provide examples of three distinct ways the word ‘prophet’ is commonly used today:
If I have eschewed the word prophet, I do not wish to attribute to myself such lofty title at the present time, for whoever is called a prophet now was once called a seer; since a prophet, my son, is properly speaking one who sees distant things through a natural knowledge of all creatures. And it can happen that the prophet bringing about the perfect light of prophecy may make manifest things both human and divine, because this cannot be done otherwise, given that the effects of predicting the future extend far off into time.
(Nostradamus, The Prophecies)[1]
We knew no one man had killed the prophet. Rather, the combined weight of racism and an absence of moral courage had crushed him. A constitution ignored, laws denied, these were the weapons. America pulled the trigger.
(Golden, 1983: 14 about Martin Luther King)
I have proved by how many prophecies the coming of the Word of God to men was foretold, and that it was announced by the Hebrew prophets whence He should come, and where and how He should be seen by men on earth, and that He was actually the Person, the eternal pre-existent Son of God, Whom we have learned to recognize by the other names of God and Lord and Chief Captain, and Angel of Great Counsel and High Priest.
(Eusebius, ‘Introduction’, Demonstratio Evangelica (The Proof of the Gospel), Book 8)[2]
The first quote suggests that a prophet is primarily a predictor of the future. According to Nostradamus (who is himself reluctant to accept the title), the defining feature of a prophet is that he or she is able to foretell events in the (distant) future. Such a person possesses unique insight into the unfolding of history. A cursory glance at the shelf labelled ‘prophecy’ in your local Christian bookstore will show that such an understanding is widespread – the biblical prophets are commonly viewed as providing detailed descriptions of events associated with the end times.
The second quote suggests that a prophet is primarily a social reformer. It is common for the label ‘prophet’ to be applied to political and social activists whose primary goal is to bring about change within their society. Thus, Golden refers to Martin Luther King Jr simply as ‘the prophet’ (see Fig. 1.1 overleaf). In this case, the biblical prophets are viewed as early advocates of social justice and defenders of the marginalized.
The third quote suggests that an Old Testament prophet is primarily a herald of Jesus. Eusebius’ statement implies that the role of Israel’s prophets was to announce and foretell the coming of the Messiah (see Fig. 1.2 overleaf). Although perhaps not so common today, this understanding has a long history in Christian circles, stretching back to the authors of the New Testament itself, and being particularly popular with the early Church Fathers.
Figure 1.1 Martin Luther King Jr is often referred to as a prophet
National Archives and Records Administration / Wikimedia Commons.
Although each of these understandings carries an element of truth, it would be problematic to assume that they provide an adequate framework for understanding the prophets of ancient Israel. Occasionally the prophets do foretell future events, but this is not as common as we might expect. Fee and Stuart have suggested that ‘Less than 2 percent of Old Testament prophecy is messianic. Less than 5 percent specifically describes the new-covenant age. Less than 1 percent concerns events yet to come in our time’ (2003: 182). According to these figures less than 8 per cent of Old Testament prophecy is concerned with the time of Jesus through to the present – the vast majority of Old Testament prophecy (more than 92 per cent!) addressed Israel’s immediate or imminent situation. To suggest that the prophets are primarily foretellers, particularly of events in our day, is therefore to emphasize only a small element of their role.
Figure 1.2 ‘Isaiah’ from von Carolsfeld’s Die Bibel in Bildern. This image clearly portrays the prophet as a predictor of Christ’s birth, death and victory over Satan
Woodcut from J. S. von Carolsfeld, Die Bibel in Bildern, Leipzig: Wigand, 1860. Wikimedia Commons.
Furthermore, although the prophets are clearly concerned with social reform and justice (see, for example, Amos 5.12; Isa. 1.16–17), there is a theological basis and dimension to their work which is not necessarily implied in the second contemporary understanding.[3] The prophets’ desire to see change in the economic and political workings of the nation is a part of their larger vision for the transformation of the people of God as a whole (including their religious life), with all this based on a certain vision of God and his requirements of his people. Contemporary social reform movements do not necessarily have this theological ‘edge’. A second, related limitation of this understanding concerns their intended audience: Israel’s prophets are primarily called to address the people of God (Israel and/or Judah), whereas social reform movements usually have a wider target, being concerned with society as a whole.[4]
Finally, although the New Testament authors recognize that the prophets do occasionally speak in ways which anticipate Jesus (see, for example, Matt. 2.5–6 quoting Mic. 5.2, and John 12.14–15 quoting Zech. 9.9), the figures from Fee and Stuart cited above indicate that this is hardly central to or the defining element of their ministry. A reliance on contemporary usage of the term ‘prophet’, therefore, is likely to result in an anachronistic understanding of the nature and roles of Israel’s prophets. Thus, we will need to turn to the text of the Old Testament itself, drawing on comparative ancient Near Eastern parallels where relevant, if we wish to develop a more accurate picture.
Figure 1.3 A terracotta relief of IĆĄtar holding her symbol (early second millennium BC). The goddess IĆĄtar of Arbela is frequently referred to in the Neo-Assyrian prophecies.
© Marie-Lan Nguyen / Wikimedia Commons.
Have you considered?
PROPHECY AS AN ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN PHENOMENON
It is clear that the phenomenon of prophecy was not unique to Israel but was, in fact, widespread throughout the ancient Near East. This is a reality which the Old Testament itself recognizes. For example, the prophet Jeremiah urges rulers from the neighbouring lands of Edom, Moab, Ammon and the Phoenician cities who may have been considering rebellion against Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, not to heed their prophets, diviners and other intermediaries (Jer. 27.1–15).
Prophetic texts have been uncovered at a number of ancient Near Eastern sites, including Mari (from the eighteenth century BC) and Nineveh (from the seventh century BC). The documents from Mari include approximately 50 letters sent to the king (usually Zimri-lim) by various officials and administrators, containing messages from various intermediaries claiming divine inspiration. Such figures may refer to themselves as being ‘sent’ by the deity, and their messages often begin with the formula ‘Thus says [the god x]’ or a similar equivalent, with the deity characteristically speaking in the first person. For example, a certain Malik-Dagan is commissioned by the god Dagan: ‘Now go, I send you. Thus you shall speak to Zimrilim saying: “Send me your messengers and lay your full report before me . . .”’ (cited in Blenkinsopp, 1996: 44). These documents almost exclusively focus on the king’s affairs (they were found as part of a larger royal archive), including his military activities, cultic issues and the need to maintain justice.*
The documents from Nineveh witness to significant prophetic activity within the Neo-Assyrian Empire (see Fig. 1.3). As with the documents from Mari, the Neo-Assyrian texts were part of a royal archive and thus focus primarily on the king’s activity. It appears that in the majority of cases the prophetic message was prompted by a crisis situation (often involving a military, political or succession concern) which resulted in the king complaining to or enquiring of a deity. The divine response is almost always a message of reassurance, emphasizing the deity’s power and reliability, giving directions on political and military matters, and assuring the king of success in his undertakings. The phrase ‘Fear not!’ is common. For example:
[Esarh]addon, king of the lands, fear [not]! . . . I am the great Lady, I am IĆĄtar of Arbela who throw your enemies before your feet. Have I spoken to you any words that you could not rely upon? I am Igtar of Arbela, I will flay your enemies and deliver them up to you. I am Igtar of Arbela, I go before you and behind you. (Nissinen, 2003: 102)
These documents also point to the existence of a significant number of female prophets.
Outside the texts from Mari and Nineveh we encounter references to prophecy in:
  1. an Old Aramaic inscription of Zakkur, king of Hamath and Luash (c.800 BC), located in northern Syria;
  2. a plaster inscription from Tell Deir ‘Alla, which was probably part of the Ammonite kingdom and is dated c.700 BC – this contains a reference to Balaam, son of Beor, a ‘visionary of the gods’ (ងāzēh ’ilāhÄ«n), who is probably the same figure mentioned in the Old Testament (Num. 22—24);
  3. the Egyptian ‘Story of Wen-Amun’ (c. tenth century BC), which narrates an episode involving ecstatic prophecy from Byblos in Phoenicia.
For further discussion of ancient Near Eastern prophecy and prophetic texts, see Nissinen, 2003; Stokl, 2012b.
1.3 What is a prophet? Old Testament answers[5]
Have you considered?
THE SIZE OF THE PHENOMENON OF PROPHECY IN ANCIENT ISRAEL
When I ask my students to name some Old Testament prophets, common responses include Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and perhaps Amos. In other words, we tend to focus on those prophets who have books attributed to them. But we need to be aware that these individuals account for only a very small (and often anomalous) minority of the total number of prophets who were at work in ancient Israel (Blenkinsopp, 1996: 47). In addition to the 55 or so named prophets in the Old Testament, the text itself recognizes the presence of literally hundreds of other prophets who remain unnamed (e.g. 1 Kings 22.6). Furthermore, even the earliest of our canonical prophets (Amos and Hosea) see themselves as standing within the context of a much wider and older phenomenon (cf. Amos 2.11–12; Hos. 6.5). In short, the canonical pro...

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