Graphic Design
eBook - ePub

Graphic Design

Learn It, Do It

Katherine A. Hughes

Share book
  1. 406 pages
  2. English
  3. ePUB (mobile friendly)
  4. Available on iOS & Android
eBook - ePub

Graphic Design

Learn It, Do It

Katherine A. Hughes

Book details
Book preview
Table of contents
Citations

About This Book

Graphic Design: Learn It, Do It is an introduction to the fundamentals of graphic design and the Adobe Creative Cloud applications used to put these concepts into practice. This book is intended for production-oriented audiences, those interested in the what, why and how of graphic design. The "what" is effective graphic design, a visual solution created using the design principles that stands out in a crowded marketplace. This discussion includes color theory, typography and page layout. Focus on the "why" of design begins with the reasons why we communicate. Attention is paid to the purpose of the visual solution and to its audiences. The conversation highlights output options (print vs. onscreen) and their related file properties. The "how" of design addresses the stages of production and use of Adobe Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC and InDesign CC to translate an idea into a visual solution. Following an overview of each application and its uses, step-by-step exercises are provided to foster familiarity with each application's workspace and its tools. These exercises provide opportunities to implement the design principles and to produce examples of work for a design portfolio.


Key Features:

  • Content based on over a decade's worth of experience teaching graphic design
  • Contemporary examples and online references
  • Guided exercises for working in the Adobe Creative Cloud applications, Photoshop CC, Illustrator CC and InDesign CC
  • Accompanying exercise files and supporting materials available for download from the book's companion website
  • Discussion questions and activities included at the end of chapters to expand the presented topics

Frequently asked questions

How do I cancel my subscription?
Simply head over to the account section in settings and click on “Cancel Subscription” - it’s as simple as that. After you cancel, your membership will stay active for the remainder of the time you’ve paid for. Learn more here.
Can/how do I download books?
At the moment all of our mobile-responsive ePub books are available to download via the app. Most of our PDFs are also available to download and we're working on making the final remaining ones downloadable now. Learn more here.
What is the difference between the pricing plans?
Both plans give you full access to the library and all of Perlego’s features. The only differences are the price and subscription period: With the annual plan you’ll save around 30% compared to 12 months on the monthly plan.
What is Perlego?
We are an online textbook subscription service, where you can get access to an entire online library for less than the price of a single book per month. With over 1 million books across 1000+ topics, we’ve got you covered! Learn more here.
Do you support text-to-speech?
Look out for the read-aloud symbol on your next book to see if you can listen to it. The read-aloud tool reads text aloud for you, highlighting the text as it is being read. You can pause it, speed it up and slow it down. Learn more here.
Is Graphic Design an online PDF/ePUB?
Yes, you can access Graphic Design by Katherine A. Hughes in PDF and/or ePUB format, as well as other popular books in Design & Web Design. We have over one million books available in our catalogue for you to explore.

Information

Publisher
CRC Press
Year
2019
ISBN
9780429664779
Edition
1
Topic
Design
Subtopic
Web Design
1
Breaking Down Design
Graphic design surrounds us. We engage graphic design both passively and actively. We experience images passively in the forms of banner ads or targeted advertisements displayed along the sides of a Web browser or in an app when we post a status update. Similarly, think about the signs passed traveling to school or work, roadside billboards and storefront signs. Against this background of visual noise, there are images that we actively seek. Consider the day’s news headlines or results from a recent sporting event; the type, photos and layouts used to present this information are components of graphic design. When a weather radar map is checked to track a band of approaching rain or snow, the colors used to represent the passing weather system have meaning; this too is a form of graphic design. Finally, think about the photos that are shared or viewed on social media. These photos reflect decisions made about the framing (what to include and exclude); the use of filters, lenses or emojis; and whether to include a text caption or a hashtag. These choices represent graphic design in action, decisions made to create an image that informs, inquires, persuades or merely entertains. These actions are at the core of why we communicate.
Why We Communicate
To Inform: We communicate in order to share messages or data with others. Our purpose is to educate or simply tell.
To Inquire: We communicate to solicit input from others. Our purpose is to gain knowledge and foster interactions.
To Persuade: We communicate to change or support a point of view. Our purpose is to sell an idea, product or service.
To Entertain: We communicate to provide a distraction or fill time. The bulk of mass media falls under this umbrella.
A single image or piece of media may satisfy multiple reasons why we communicate. Watching a DIY (do-it-yourself) video may initially serve “to entertain.” However, when a viewer is inspired to try a technique demonstrated on the program or to purchase a featured product, the additional reasons “to inform,” “to inquire” and “to persuade” become involved.
First Lines, Then Shapes
As consumers, we are presented with images; as designers we have the potential to create images. In this book, we discuss how to plan for and create effective graphic design. Let’s begin with one of the most basic elements of design, the line. A line can possess meaning and can communicate its meaning to an audience. Take a look at the horizontal line in Figure 1.1. What could it represent? Perhaps a road… a snake… a division between sections in a document? There are many potential meanings of this line.
122536.webp
Figure 1.1
Lines: (A) horizontal line, (B) wavy line, (C) jagged line.
What happens when a few curves are introduced into the line? What could this line represent? Maybe hills… rolling waves… the profile of a guitar?
Finally, convert the curves into sharp elbows. What could the jagged line represent? Perhaps a reading from an EKG (heart) monitor… the stock market… a jagged mountain range?
How these lines are interpreted and what is “seen” in each line is influenced by our personal experiences, background and context. The people, places and things that we have each been exposed to serve as a mental reference when we attempt to apply meaning to new experiences or, in this case, a series of lines. As consumers and designers, we regularly draw on what we know to provide context or meaning to an image.
Lines and Strokes
When a line is used to outline a shape or an object, it is referred to as a stroke. A stroke possesses multiple properties that can be adjusted to alter a line’s appearance, including length, weight (thickness), color and type (e.g., solid, dashed, wavy).
From basic lines, we progress to shapes. What happens to the meaning of the original horizontal line when its ends are connected and a circle is created (refer to Figure 1.2)? What could this shape represent? Is it a ball… the full moon… a scoop of ice cream?
122572.webp
Figure 1.2
Shapes: (A) circle, (B) triangle, (C) octagon.
Let’s try this with another shape—a triangle. What could it signify? Perhaps a yield sign… a slice of pizza… a cone for the scoop of ice cream?
Once more, this time let’s use an octagon. Other than a stop sign, what could this eight-sided shape represent?
Symbols, Logos and Signatures
Building on a basic shape, let’s see what else it can communicate with a few minor adjustments. Beginning with a blue circle, what happens when four more circ...

Table of contents