The Divine Comedy
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The Divine Comedy

Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise

Dante Alighieri

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478 pages
English
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eBook - ePub

The Divine Comedy

Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise

Dante Alighieri

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About This Book

The medieval classic that takes readers on a guided tour of the afterlife and on a spiritual journey toward God.

Written in the fourteenth century, this epic poem continues to entrance readers as it explores the nine circles of hell, the mountain of purgatory, and the spheres of heaven, detailing those who inhabit each and the sins and virtues that led them there.

This masterpiece is a work of literature, history, psychology, and philosophy—and a deeply insightful exploration of Christian theology that, in painting a picture of the afterlife, allows us to reflect on earthly life as well.

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Information

Year
2020
ISBN
9781504061698
Subtopic
Poetry

The Divine Comedy

Inferno

Canto I

Midway upon the journey of our life
I found myself within a forest dark,
For the straightforward pathway had been lost.
Ah me! how hard a thing it is to say
What was this forest savage, rough, and stern,
Which in the very thought renews the fear.
So bitter is it, death is little more;
But of the good to treat, which there I found,
Speak will I of the other things I saw there.
I cannot well repeat how there I entered,
So full was I of slumber at the moment
In which I had abandoned the true way.
But after I had reached a mountain’s foot,
At that point where the valley terminated,
Which had with consternation pierced my heart,
Upward I looked, and I beheld its shoulders,
Vested already with that planet’s rays
Which leadeth others right by every road.
Then was the fear a little quieted
That in my heart’s lake had endured throughout
The night, which I had passed so piteously.
And even as he, who, with distressful breath,
Forth issued from the sea upon the shore,
Turns to the water perilous and gazes;
So did my soul, that still was fleeing onward,
Turn itself back to re-behold the pass
Which never yet a living person left.
After my weary body I had rested,
The way resumed I on the desert slope,
So that the firm foot ever was the lower.
And lo! almost where the ascent began,
A panther light and swift exceedingly,
Which with a spotted skin was covered o’er!
And never moved she from before my face,
Nay, rather did impede so much my way,
That many times I to return had turned.
The time was the beginning of the morning,
And up the sun was mounting with those stars
That with him were, what time the Love Divine
At first in motion set those beauteous things;
So were to me occasion of good hope,
The variegated skin of that wild beast,
The hour of time, and the delicious season;
But not so much, that did not give me fear
A lion’s aspect which appeared to me.
He seemed as if against me he were coming
With head uplifted, and with ravenous hunger,
So that it seemed the air was afraid of him;
And a she-wolf, that with all hungerings
Seemed to be laden in her meagreness,
And many folk has caused to live forlorn!
She brought upon me so much heaviness,
With the affright that from her aspect came,
That I the hope relinquished of the height.
And as he is who willingly acquires,
And the time comes that causes him to lose,
Who weeps in all his thoughts and is despondent,
E’en such made me that beast withouten peace,
Which, coming on against me by degrees
Thrust me back thither where the sun is silent.
While I was rushing downward to the lowland,
Before mine eyes did one present himself,
Who seemed from long-continued silence hoarse.
When I beheld him in the desert vast,
“Have pity on me,” unto him I cried,
“Whiche’er thou art, or shade or real man!”
He answered me: “Not man; man once I was,
And both my parents were of Lombardy,
And Mantuans by country both of them.
‘Sub Julio’ was I born, though it was late,
And lived at Rome under the good Augustus,
During the time of false and lying gods.
A poet was I, and I sang that just
Son of Anchises, who came forth from Troy,
After that Ilion the superb was burned.
But thou, why goest thou back to such annoyance?
Why climb’st thou not the Mount Delectable,
Which is the source and cause of every joy?”
“Now, art thou that Virgilius and that fountain
Which spreads abroad so wide a river of speech?”
I made response to him with bashful forehead.
“O, of the other poets honor and light,
Avail me the long study and great love
That have impelled me to explore thy volume!
Thou art my master, and my author thou,
Thou art alone the one from whom I took
The beautiful style that has done honor to me.
Behold the beast, for which I have turned back;
Do thou protect me from her, famous Sage,
For she doth make my veins and pulses tremble.”
“Thee it behoves to take another road,”
Responded he, when he beheld me weeping,
“If from this savage place thou wouldst escape;
Because this beast, at which thou criest out,
Suffers not any one to pass her way,
But so doth harass him, that she destroys him;
And has a nature so malign and ruthless,
That never doth she glut her greedy will,
And after food is hungrier than before.
Many the animals with whom she weds,
And more they shall be still, until the Greyhound
Comes, who shall mak...

Table of contents

Citation styles for The Divine Comedy
APA 6 Citation
Alighieri, D. (2020). The Divine Comedy ([edition unavailable]). Open Road Media. Retrieved from https://www.perlego.com/book/2448621/the-divine-comedy-inferno-purgatory-and-paradise-pdf (Original work published 2020)
Chicago Citation
Alighieri, Dante. (2020) 2020. The Divine Comedy. [Edition unavailable]. Open Road Media. https://www.perlego.com/book/2448621/the-divine-comedy-inferno-purgatory-and-paradise-pdf.
Harvard Citation
Alighieri, D. (2020) The Divine Comedy. [edition unavailable]. Open Road Media. Available at: https://www.perlego.com/book/2448621/the-divine-comedy-inferno-purgatory-and-paradise-pdf (Accessed: 15 October 2022).
MLA 7 Citation
Alighieri, Dante. The Divine Comedy. [edition unavailable]. Open Road Media, 2020. Web. 15 Oct. 2022.