Architecture
eBook - ePub

Architecture

Form, Space, and Order

Francis D. K. Ching

Share book
  1. English
  2. ePUB (mobile friendly)
  3. Available on iOS & Android
eBook - ePub

Architecture

Form, Space, and Order

Francis D. K. Ching

Book details
Book preview
Table of contents
Citations

About This Book

The revered architectural reference, updated with contemporary examples and interactive 3D models

The Interactive Resource Center is an online learning environment where instructors and students can access the tools they need to make efficient use of their time, while reinforcing and assessing their understanding of key concepts for successful understanding of the course. An access card with redemption code for the online Interactive Resource Center is included with all new, print copies or can be purchased separately. (***If you rent or purchase a used book with an access code, the access code may have been redeemed previously and you may have to purchase a new access code -ISBN: 9781118986837).

The online Interactive Resource Center contains resources tied to the book, such as:

  • Interactive Animations highlighting key concepts
  • Photo Gallery of architectural precedents illustrated in the book
  • Flashcards for focused learning

Architecture: Form, Space, and Order, Fourth Edition is the classic introduction to the basic vocabulary of architectural design, updated with new information on emerging trends and recent developments. This bestselling visual reference helps both students and professionals understand the vocabulary of architectural design by examining how space and form are ordered in the environment.

Essential and timeless, the fundamental elements of space and form still present a challenge to those who crave a deeper understanding. Taking a critical look at the evolution of spaces, Architecture distills complex concepts of design into a clear focus that inspires, bringing difficult abstractions to life. The book is illustrated throughout to demonstrate the concepts presented, and show the relationships between fundamental elements of architecture through the ages and across cultures. Topics include:

  • Primary elements and the principles of space design
  • Form and space, including light, view, openings, and enclosures
  • Organization of space, and the elements and relationships of circulation
  • Proportion and scale, including proportioning systems and anthropometry

Frequently asked questions

How do I cancel my subscription?
Simply head over to the account section in settings and click on “Cancel Subscription” - it’s as simple as that. After you cancel, your membership will stay active for the remainder of the time you’ve paid for. Learn more here.
Can/how do I download books?
At the moment all of our mobile-responsive ePub books are available to download via the app. Most of our PDFs are also available to download and we're working on making the final remaining ones downloadable now. Learn more here.
What is the difference between the pricing plans?
Both plans give you full access to the library and all of Perlego’s features. The only differences are the price and subscription period: With the annual plan you’ll save around 30% compared to 12 months on the monthly plan.
What is Perlego?
We are an online textbook subscription service, where you can get access to an entire online library for less than the price of a single book per month. With over 1 million books across 1000+ topics, we’ve got you covered! Learn more here.
Do you support text-to-speech?
Look out for the read-aloud symbol on your next book to see if you can listen to it. The read-aloud tool reads text aloud for you, highlighting the text as it is being read. You can pause it, speed it up and slow it down. Learn more here.
Is Architecture an online PDF/ePUB?
Yes, you can access Architecture by Francis D. K. Ching in PDF and/or ePUB format, as well as other popular books in Architecture & Architecture Design. We have over one million books available in our catalogue for you to explore.

Information

Publisher
Wiley
Year
2014
ISBN
9781118745137

Chapter 1
Primary Elements

“All pictorial form begins with the point that sets itself in motion… The point moves … and the line comes into being—the first dimension. If the line shifts to form a plane, we obtain a two-dimensional element. In the movement from plane to spaces, the clash of planes gives rise to body (three-dimensional) … A summary of the kinetic energies which move the point into a line, the line into a plane, and the plane into a spatial dimension.”
Paul Klee
The Thinking Eye: The Notebooks of Paul Klee
(English translation)
1961

PRIMARY ELEMENTS

This opening chapter presents the primary elements of form in the order of their growth from the point to a one-dimensional line, from the line to a two-dimensional plane, and from the plane to a three-dimensional volume. Each element is first considered as a conceptual element, then as a visual element in the vocabulary of architectural design.
As conceptual elements, the point, line, plane, and volume are not visible except to the mind’s eye. While they do not actually exist, we nevertheless feel their presence. We can sense a point at the meeting of two lines, a line marking the contour of a plane, a plane enclosing a volume, and the volume of an object that occupies space.
When made visible to the eye on paper or in three-dimensional space, these elements become form with characteristics of substance, shape, size, color, and texture. As we experience these forms in our environment, we should be able to perceive in their structure the existence of the primary elements of point, line, plane, and volume.
images
As the prime generator of form, the
images

POINT

images
images
A point marks a position in space. Conceptually, it has no length, width, or depth, and is therefore static, centralized, and directionless.
images
As the prime element in the vocabulary of form, a point can serve to mark:
  • the two ends of a line
  • the intersection of two lines
  • the meeting of lines at the corner of a plane or volume
  • the center of a field
images
Although a point theoretically has neither shape nor form, it begins to make its presence felt when placed within a visual field. At the center of its environment, a point is stable and at rest, organizing surrounding elements about itself and dominating its field.
images
When the point is moved off-center, however, its field becomes more aggressive and begins to compete for visual supremacy. Visual tension is created between the point and its field.

POINT ELEMENTS

images
Piazza del Campidoglio, Rome, c....

Table of contents