Controversies in Globalization
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Controversies in Globalization

Contending Approaches to International Relations

Peter M Haas, John A. Hird

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Controversies in Globalization

Contending Approaches to International Relations

Peter M Haas, John A. Hird

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Inhaltsverzeichnis
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Über dieses Buch

Debate style readers can be powerful teaching tools, but they are only effective in so far as the readings really speak to one another. Without readings in true dialogue, the crux of the debate is lost on students, the reader fails to add real depth to the course, and students are left in the lurch. Controversies in Globalizati on solves this issue by inviting 17 pairs of scholars and practitioners to write specifically for the volume, directly addressing current and relevant questions in international relations through concise "yes" and "no" pieces on topics related to security, political economy, the environment, public health, democracy, demography, and social issues like gender and ethnicity. At the request of reviewers, new to this edition are three chapters covering the financial crisis, maritime security, and international conflict. Providing students with necessary context, the editors offer introductions that effectively frame the debate and make clear what is at stake, both from a theoretical as well as from a practical perspective. Concluding discussion questions in each chapter encourage critical thinking and analysis. Haas and Hird?s edited collection helps readers come to terms with the varying perspectives on globalization, and urges critical reflection and the exploration of alternate views.

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Inhaltsverzeichnis

  1. CONTROVERSIES IN GLOBALIZATION-FRONT COVER
  2. CONTROVERSIES IN GLOBALIZATION
  3. CONTENTS
  4. CONTRIBUTORS
  5. About The Editors
  6. About The Contributors
  7. PREFACE
  8. How The Book Is Organized
  9. Acknowledgments
  10. UNDERSTANDING GLOBALIZATION
  11. What’s New About Globalization?
  12. Technological Innovation
  13. Expanded Economic Interdependence
  14. Trade
  15. Investment
  16. Demographic Dispersion
  17. Political Diversification
  18. Environmental Degradation (And Concern)
  19. Ideational Convergence
  20. Globalization’s Effects
  21. Power Shifts
  22. Shifting Political Identities
  23. Complexity of Decision Making
  24. Perspectives On Globalization
  25. Political Realism: L’état Eternel
  26. Market Liberalism: Swords into Stock Shares
  27. Skepticism: Accentuate the Positive and Adjust the Negative
  28. Radicalism: Challenge the Dominant Paradigm
  29. Cosmopolitan Transformationalism: Jazz and Constant Improvisation
  30. Conclusion
  31. Discussion Questions
  32. Notes
  33. CHAPTER 1: TRADE LIBERALIZATION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH: DOES TRADE LIBERALIZATION CONTRIBUTE TO ECONOMIC PROSPERITY?
  34. Discussion Questions
  35. YES: David Dollar, U.S. Treasury Department
  36. Growing Integration Between North And South
  37. The Link From Integration To Growth
  38. China
  39. India
  40. Vietnam
  41. Uganda
  42. Conclusion
  43. Notes
  44. NO: Robert H. Wade, London School of Economics and Political Science
  45. Givens
  46. Free Trade Theory
  47. Evidence for Free Trade
  48. New Trade Theory
  49. New New Trade Theory
  50. Theories of Increasing Returns, Multiple Equilibria, and Spatial Structure
  51. Industrial Policy And Inter-State Competition
  52. Evidence
  53. Optimal Trade Policy
  54. Conclusion
  55. Notes
  56. CHAPTER 2: TRADE AND EQUALITY: DOES FREE TRADE PROMOTE ECONOMIC EQUALITY?
  57. Discussion Questions
  58. Note
  59. YES: L. Alan Winters, University of Sussex
  60. Ground Clearing
  61. Trade and Inter-Country Inequality
  62. Trade and Intra-Country Inequality
  63. Intra-Country Inequality: The Direct Effects On Households
  64. Taxation
  65. Prices and Markets
  66. Factor Markets
  67. Conclusion
  68. Notes
  69. NO: Kate Vyborny and Nancy Birdsall, Center for Global Development
  70. Free Trade Increases Income
  71. The Role of Relative Inequality
  72. Economic Theory and Economic Realities
  73. Adjustment Costs
  74. Advantages for Countries with Most Productive Assets
  75. Costs of Market Failures on the Poor
  76. Bias against the Poor in Global Economic Rules
  77. Solution: Complementary “Fair Growth” Policies
  78. A Global Social Contract
  79. Notes
  80. CHAPTER 3: POVERTY: CAN FOREIGN AID REDUCE POVERTY?
  81. Discussion Questions
  82. YES: Jeffrey D. Sachs, The Earth Institute at Columbia University
  83. Development Assistance As A Tool In Promoting Economic Development
  84. U.S. Commitments to Economic Development and Poverty Reduction
  85. Current Levels of U.S. Official Development Assistance in Comparative Perspective
  86. Private Development Assistance
  87. What Works and What Doesn’t Work With ODA
  88. Modernizing U.S. Development Assistance In The Twenty-First Century
  89. The Goals
  90. The Technologies
  91. The Delivery Systems
  92. The Financing
  93. The Structure of U.S. Development Assistance
  94. The Financing of U.S. Development Assistance In The Next Administration
  95. Notes
  96. NO: George B. N. Ayittey, American University
  97. Africa’s Leaky Begging Bowl
  98. Monumental Leadership Failure
  99. Acrobatics On Reform
  100. Better Ways Of Helping Africa
  101. Notes
  102. CHAPTER 4: FINANCIAL CRISES: WILL PREVENTING FUTURE FINANCIAL CRISES REQUIRE CONCERTED INTERNATIONAL RULEMAKING?
  103. Discussion Questions
  104. YES: Jagdish N. Bhagwati, Columbia University
  105. The Perils Of Gung-Ho International Financial Capitalism
  106. The Wrong Explanations
  107. Problems with Free Capital Flows
  108. The Wall Street-Treasury Complex
  109. The Question of Malaysian Capital Controls
  110. Where Do We Stand?
  111. Lessons From The Current Crisis
  112. Market Fundamentalism
  113. Globalization and Financial Innovation
  114. Financial Regulation
  115. Free Trade, Not Protectionism
  116. Morality in the Financial Sector
  117. Note
  118. NO: Philip I. Levy, Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs
  119. Introduction
  120. What Does It Mean To “Require” Coordination?
  121. Did A Lack of Coordination Cause The Global Financial Crisis?
  122. Were Countries Capable of Insulating Themselves?
  123. Weak Prospects For Coordination
  124. Conclusion
  125. Notes
  126. CHAPTER 5: TERRORISM AND SECURITY: IS INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM A SIGNIFICANT CHALLENGE TO NATIONAL SECURITY?
  127. Discussion Questions
  128. YES: Charles Duelfer, Omnis, Inc.
  129. Dynamics Of The Post-9/11 Decade
  130. Analyzing The Trends
  131. Terrorism and Security Policy
  132. Summary
  133. Notes
  134. NO: John Mueller, Ohio State University
  135. Evaluating The Challenge
  136. The Prospect of A Terrorist Nuclear Bomb
  137. The Challenge From Within
  138. Notes
  139. CHAPTER 6: NUCLEAR WEAPONS: SHOULD THE UNITED STATES OR THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY AGGRESSIVELY PURSUE NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION POLICIES?
  140. Discussion Questions
  141. Note
  142. YES: Scott D. Sagan and Reid C. Pauly, Stanford University
  143. Why Worry?
  144. Iraq
  145. North Korea
  146. Iran
  147. Nuclear Terrorism
  148. Effective Nonproliferation Policies
  149. Proliferation Fatalism
  150. Global Zero
  151. Conclusions
  152. Notes
  153. NO: Todd S. Sechser, University of Virginia
  154. Proliferation and The Historical Record
  155. The Frequency of Armed Conflict
  156. The Intensity of Military Conflict
  157. Conventional-Arms Spending
  158. Do Near Misses Count?
  159. Proliferation and U.S. Foreign Policy
  160. Conclusion
  161. Notes
  162. CHAPTER 7: MILITARY INTERVENTION AND HUMAN RIGHTS: IS FOREIGN MILITARY INTERVENTION JUSTIFIED BY WIDESPREAD HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES?
  163. Discussion Questions
  164. Note
  165. YES: Jack Donnelly, University of Denver
  166. 1. Justification
  167. 2. The Genocide Exception
  168. 3. Authority, Intentions, Consequences, and Means
  169. 4. Justifying Armed Humanitarian Intervention
  170. 5. The Responsibility To Protect
  171. 6. Darfur
  172. 7. Conclusion
  173. Notes
  174. NO: Doug Bandow, The Cato Institute
  175. Notes
  176. CHAPTER 8: MARITIME SECURITY: DOES CONTROLLING PIRACY AND OTHER CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES REQUIRE SYSTEMATIC STATE INTERVENTIONS?
  177. Discussion Questions
  178. Notes
  179. YES: Scott Mckenzie, World Affairs Council of New Orleans
  180. Somali Pirates—Failed States
  181. Anonymous and The Internet—New and Unregulated Territory
  182. Failure of International Control Results In Violations of Civil and Human Rights
  183. International Solutions
  184. Conclusion
  185. Notes
  186. NO: Karl T. Muth, London School of Economics and Political Science
  187. A Brief History of Private Security
  188. The Failure of State Cooperation
  189. The First Contention
  190. The Second Contention
  191. From Triage To Treatment
  192. Conclusion
  193. Notes
  194. CHAPTER 9: INTERNATIONAL CONFLICT: IS WAR LIKELY BETWEEN THE GREAT POWERS?
  195. Discussion Questions
  196. Note
  197. YES: John F. Copper, Rhodes College
  198. Defining The Great Powers and War
  199. A U.S.–China War: The State Level Of Analysis
  200. A U.S.–China War: The Global Level of Analysis
  201. A U.S. War With China: The Human Level of Analysis
  202. Conclusions
  203. Notes
  204. NO: Joshua S. Goldstein, School of International Service, American University
  205. Explaining The Great-Power Peace
  206. Strengthening Norms against Violence
  207. Nuclear Weapons
  208. Prosperity and Interdependence
  209. The United Nations
  210. Great-Power War Scenarios
  211. Proxy Wars
  212. Conclusion
  213. CHAPTER 10: CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE ENVIRONMENT: CAN INTERNATIONAL REGIMES BE EFFECTIVE MEANS TO RESTRAIN CARBON EMISSIONS?
  214. Discussion Questions
  215. Note
  216. YES: Brent Ranalli, The Cadmus Group
  217. Today’s Sorry Situation
  218. Preliminaries
  219. Solid Foundations
  220. 1. A strong, versatile framework: convention and protocol
  221. 2. Differentiated responsibility
  222. 3. Meaningful commitments
  223. 4. Flexible implementation
  224. Echoes of The Montreal Protocol
  225. Stumbling Blocks In Climate Negotiations
  226. Effectiveness
  227. Procedural Issues
  228. Participation
  229. Diplomatic Windows of Opportunity
  230. Notes
  231. NO: Samuel Thernstrom, Clean Air Task Force
  232. The Quixotic Quest For Uniform National Emissions Standards
  233. The Futility Of Equity Arguments
  234. Differing Interests, Abilities, and Approaches To Climate Policy
  235. The Quest For A Comprehensive International Climate Policy
  236. Notes
  237. CHAPTER 11: THE FUTURE OF ENERGY: SHOULD GOVERNMENTS ENCOURAGE THE DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE ENERGY SOURCES TO HELP REDUCE DEPENDENCE ON FOSSIL FUELS?
  238. Discussion Questions
  239. YES: Christopher Flavin, Worldwatch Institute
  240. Avoiding Catastrophe
  241. The Convenient Truth
  242. Energy Productivity and Supply
  243. Making Energy Markets Work Through Government
  244. The Final Tipping Point
  245. Conclusion
  246. Notes
  247. NO: Michael Lynch, Strategic Energy & Economic Research, Inc.
  248. Finite Resources: Malthus Redux
  249. Benefits: Green Pie In The Sky?
  250. Pollution Reduction
  251. High Prices: DĂ©jĂ  Vu All Over Again
  252. Jobs
  253. Energy Security
  254. Coming Down To Earth
  255. Economics: Not The Only Thing, But At Least Something
  256. Other Shortcomings
  257. Conclusion
  258. CHAPTER 12: HIV/AIDS: SHOULD THE WEALTHY NATIONS PROMOTE ANTI-HIV/AIDS EFFORTS IN POOR NATIONS?
  259. Discussion Questions
  260. YES: Mead Over, Center for Global Development
  261. NO: Mark Heywood, AIDS Law Project
  262. Is There A New Commitment To Global Health?
  263. From State To Nonstate
  264. Global Disease Threats: Self-Interest First
  265. Developing Countries: Health At The Margins
  266. Health and Underdevelopment: Globalization and Its Consequence For Public Health
  267. Is Investing In Health An Economic Necessity?
  268. Health Is A Human Right and a Legal Entitlement
  269. Notes
  270. CHAPTER 13: GENDER: SHOULD THE UNITED STATES AGGRESSIVELY PROMOTE WOMEN’S RIGHTS IN DEVELOPING NATIONS?
  271. Discussion Questions
  272. YES: Isobel Coleman, Council on Foreign Relations
  273. Support For Girls’ Education: A Foreign Policy “No-Brainer”
  274. Beyond Education: Health and Jobs
  275. Conclusion
  276. Notes
  277. NO: Marcia E. Greenberg, Independent Gender Mainstreaming Consultant
  278. Introduction
  279. A Preliminary Clarification Regarding The Objective: “Rights” Or The Well-Being Of Women And Girls?
  280. Address The Contexts and Causes That Enable or Generate Violations of Women’s Rights
  281. Rethink Reliance on Legal Systems and Courts
  282. Shift Focus From Rights To Development, But Also From Women To Gender Equality That Includes Men and Boys As Well
  283. The U.S. on The World Stage
  284. Support Women’s Rights and Well-Being Through U.S. Manageable Interests and Taking Responsibility for Impacts
  285. Concluding Thoughts
  286. Notes
  287. CHAPTER 14: IMMIGRATION: SHOULD COUNTRIES LIBERALIZE IMMIGRATION POLICIES?
  288. Discussion Questions
  289. Note
  290. YES: James F. Hollifield, Southern Methodist University
  291. Introduction
  292. The Global Migration “Crisis”
  293. Migration and Globalization
  294. Managing Migration In A New Era of Globalization
  295. The Emerging “Migration State”
  296. NO: Philip Martin, University of California, Davis
  297. Migration and Labor
  298. Differences Motivate Migration
  299. Why People Migrate
  300. Differences and Linkages
  301. Should Countries Liberalize?
  302. Notes
  303. CHAPTER 15: CULTURE AND DIVERSITY: SHOULD DEVELOPMENT EFFORTS SEEK TO PRESERVE LOCAL CULTURE?
  304. Discussion Questions
  305. YES: Elsa Stamatopoulou, Secretariat of theUnited Nations Permanent Forum onIndigenous Issues
  306. The Concept of Development Within The International Normative Framework
  307. The Concepts of Culture and of Preserving Cultures
  308. The Concept of Local Culture
  309. Indigenous Peoples and International Standards
  310. The Vision of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
  311. The Linkage of Indigenous Peoples’ Cultural Rights to Development
  312. Conclusion: Development with Culture
  313. Notes
  314. NO: Kwame Anthony Appiah, Princeton University
  315. Cosmopolitanism Combats Homogeneity
  316. The Ambiguity of Authenticity
  317. Adapting and Interpreting Cultural Influences
  318. Cosmopolitanism Versus Neofundamentalism: Tension Between Liberty and Diversity
  319. Understanding, and Possibly (But Not Necessarily) Agreeing
  320. The Case For Contamination
  321. CHAPTER 16: CIVIL SOCIETY: DO NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS WIELD TOO MUCH POWER?
  322. Discussion Questions
  323. Notes
  324. YES: Kenneth Anderson, Washington College of Law, American University
  325. From “International Ngos” To “Global Civil Society”
  326. What’s Wrong with The Conventional Account of Global Civil Society?
  327. Yes, Too Powerful If . . .
  328. Notes
  329. NO: Marlies Glasius, University of Amsterdam
  330. Transparency
  331. Equality
  332. Deliberation
  333. Representation
  334. Participation
  335. The Ethical Contribution
  336. CHAPTER 17: DEMOCRACY: SHOULD ALL NATIONS BE ENCOURAGED TO PROMOTE DEMOCRATIZATION?
  337. Discussion Questions
  338. YES: Francis Fukuyama, The Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law at Stanford University, and Michael McFaul, U.S. Ambassador to Russia
  339. The Case For Democracy Promotion
  340. U.S. Interests
  341. American Values
  342. Engaging The Case Against Democracy Promotion
  343. Modalities of Democracy Promotion
  344. Restoring the American Example
  345. Revitalizing Dual Track Diplomacy
  346. Reorganizing Democracy Assistance
  347. Enhancing and Creating International Institutions for Democracy Promotion
  348. Strengthening International Norms
  349. Notes
  350. NO: Edward D. Mansfield, University of Pennsylvania, and Jack Snyder, Columbia University
  351. The Democratic Peace
  352. Transitions To Nationalism and War
  353. The Daunting “To Do” List of Democratization
  354. The Oxymoron of Imposed Democracy
  355. Being Patient and Getting The Sequence Right
  356. In The Meantime, Normal Diplomacy
  357. Notes
  358. GLOSSARY
  359. REFERENCES
  360. INDEX
Zitierstile fĂŒr Controversies in Globalization

APA 6 Citation

[author missing]. (2012). Controversies in Globalization (2nd ed.). SAGE Publications. Retrieved from https://www.perlego.com/book/2800596/controversies-in-globalization-contending-approaches-to-international-relations-pdf (Original work published 2012)

Chicago Citation

[author missing]. (2012) 2012. Controversies in Globalization. 2nd ed. SAGE Publications. https://www.perlego.com/book/2800596/controversies-in-globalization-contending-approaches-to-international-relations-pdf.

Harvard Citation

[author missing] (2012) Controversies in Globalization. 2nd edn. SAGE Publications. Available at: https://www.perlego.com/book/2800596/controversies-in-globalization-contending-approaches-to-international-relations-pdf (Accessed: 15 October 2022).

MLA 7 Citation

[author missing]. Controversies in Globalization. 2nd ed. SAGE Publications, 2012. Web. 15 Oct. 2022.